BCM332: The War on Information


Information is Ammunition’ by flickr user Victor van Dijk under license CC BY-NC 2.0

If time (or in your own time) Watch this – Riz Ahmed makes the link between representation, and information.




Have a look at: https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/about/

Where do you get your information from?

Do you trust it?

Peer Feedback on Case Studies – some useful links:

Strategies to enhance peer feedback

Guidelines for students – peer review




BCM289: Translation of Comedy and Drama

Transnational Adaptations:

On Homeland:


Watch “Metastatis” (Columbian Breaking Bad)









#BCM332: On and Behind the Screen: Why Representation Matters


  • Tips on Peer teaching
  • Time to work shop your case studies
  • Time to spend with Peer Teaching groups
  • First 500 part of case study due in Moodle this WED 9/8/17, 5pm (upload link to your blog).
  • You will not receive a grade until the final submission on 6/9/17 – but I will provide feedback for you to revise.



As I mentioned in the lecture, this week, Netflix has started the #FirsttimeIsawMe hashtag as a way to promote their series Dear White People.

Watch this.




Christopher Bell TED talk on female superhero merchandise.

What are your thoughts on this in relation to representation?

Do you think there is a responsibility of companies to represent characters equally?




The main things I would suggest

  • a variety of activities
  • things you can do in small groups – and hopefully have students talk to one another – try to make it interactive.
  • As you will see in the outline, feel free to bring handouts, show the class any visual material and have them discuss. At the end of each tutorial, come and see me if you need any handouts printed etc, and I can do this for you before class.
  • LOOK AT THE COURSE OUTLINE – lots of resources with ideas! Here are a few more:





#BCM241: Media Audiences and Ethnography


Image: Donald Iain Smith via Huffington Post

Additional sources for this week’s tutorial:




(from 2.55)

#BCM289: Reality Television Formats


What do you notice about this clip?

Do you think reality TV has the ability to inspire change?

Potential sources for this week:








BCM332: UNESCO, diversity and the digital divide


The course is centred around two aims:

To examine strategies and campaigns to address global inequalities in media and information flows; and

To explore the rights and responsibilities of global media citizenship through case studies of media regulation, and citizens’ media initiatives.

It is a good idea to keep coming back to these ideas, and refer back to them as a touchstone throughout the semester,  as you write your case studies, and plan out your activities for peer teaching. Ask yourself – how do the examples you have chosen relate back to these aims?

The digital divide – Broadband access in India. Watch this:

What did you learn from this?

How might it relate to the issue of the ‘digital divide’?


Have a look at this report on digital inclusion in Australia.

  • What did you discover?
  • What can a document like this tell us about the reality of digital access in Australia?
  • Thinking critically, what voices are absent from this report?

BCM241: Intro to Media Spaces/ Television


Hayden Orpheum, Cremorne. Image: Renee Middlemost

Welcome to BCM 241!

  • What does your media space look like?
  • The above picture is of one of my favourite spaces to consume media, the Cremorne Orpheum.  I am really interested in cinemas as a place/space, and how ideas of public and private consumption of films overlap with the advent of home theatres, online viewing, Netflix etc. This is a discussion we can have in class in the coming weeks – particularly in Week 5 where our focus is on cinema spaces.
  • Practicalities: have you –
  • entered your blog/twitter details in the big spreadsheet (accessed through Moodle)?
  • made sure you are receiving SOLS messages? Be sure to check our Moodle site regularly for messages from the teaching team.
  • subscribed to the combined BCM241 blog (Maphub)? This is a space where we will reflect on the weekly topics, and showcase the best student work across the session. If not here is the link: https://maphub.wordpress.com/2017/07/29/week-1-2017-the-story-continues/


  • WEEK 2: Television: strange objects and media spaces
  • This week our focus is on the introduction of television into the home, and how this changed the media space, both in private (issues of rearranging furniture, schedules, family life) and more recently in public (how we consume television on different devices, and in public spaces).
  • Memories… if you are too young (!) ask your interview candidate about some of these!
  • http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/history-culture/2016/06/top-10-aussie-tv-dramas
  • READ this: http://actf.com.au/news/10249/lasting-memories-of-australian-children-s-television
  • Reflect on your own experiences with television.
  • What are you first memories of television? Can you remember a time without it? How did it fit into the flow of your everyday family routine?
  • Keep those answers in mind while you carry out this week’s blogging task: to carry out an interview with someone older than you, on their memories of television spaces in their childhood. To guide you in what questions you might ask, take a look at the Memory Conversations Guide (under the week 2 tab in Moodle).
  • Be sure to behave ethically during the interview process, especially as the information will be published on your blog. Ask permission to use this information, ask how your interview candidate would like to be identified (or not) etc.
  • If this is someone you know well, you might like to try an unstructured conversation; for someone less familiar you may stick more closely to the questions in the Guide.
  • In writing up your blog, consider comparing what you have learned to your own experience; in class next week we will discuss the key themes that have emerged.
  • For those of you who completed BCM212 last session this is an opportunity to practice the research values discussed such as respect, flexibility, and reflexivity.